This is episode #433, and my guest today is Tim Grimmett.

Tim is a veteran real estate investor that’s been investing for 20 years. He’s seen market cycles, and more importantly, has seen lots of other investors, including himself, focus on things that don’t get them closer to their goals.

Most of us have financial and lifestyle goals, but more often than not, our investing activities lead us down a path where we’re not getting closer to our goals….such as rehabbing or wholesaling a property that could have been a great rental…with the potential to pay us for a lifetime.

Today we talk all about building a business that can set us free, and making sure we focus on the activities that will get us there.

BTW – if you haven’t yet, please subscribe to the show from wherever you’are listening to is today, and we’d love a positive review on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, YouTube, or any other platform you might find us on!

Please help me welcome Tim to the show!

Highlights of this show

  • Meet Tim Grimmett, veteran real estate investor from the St. Louis area.
  • Learn why many real estate investors lose sight of their true goals and spend too much time on activities that are a distraction.
  • Join the conversation on the importance of generating cash flowing assets to support your lifestyle.
  • Listen in as we discuss why doing 1 deal at a time is a recipe for failure.

Resources and Links from this show:

Listen to the Audio Version of this Episode

FlipNerd Show Transcript:

Mike:This is the flipnerd.com “Expert Real Estate Investing Show,” the show for real estate investors, whether you’re a veteran or brand new. I’m your host Mike Hambright, and each week I bring you a new expert guest that will share their knowledge and lessons with you. If you’re excited about real estate investing, believe in personal responsibility and taking control of your life and financial destiny, you are in the right place.
This is episode number 433. And my guest today is Tim Grimmett. Tim is a veteran real estate investor that’s been investing for around 20 years. And he’s seen market cycles and more importantly, he’s seen lots of other investors and even himself focus on things that don’t get them closer to their goals. Most of us have financial and lifestyle goals. But more often than not, our investing activities lead us down a path where we’re not getting closer to our goals, such as maybe rehabbing or wholesaling a property that could actually make a great rental and pay us for a lifetime, right? Today, we talked about building a business that can set us free, and make sure that we focus on the activities that will get us there.
By the way, if you haven’t yet, before we get started here, if you haven’t yet, please subscribe to the show from wherever you’re listening to today. If you’re listening on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or YouTube or any other platform other than flipnerd.com, we’d appreciate it if you give us a positive review and subscribe out there. We love it. Makes us feel good and makes us feel good that after 433 episodes you guys still love us. So appreciate that. Thanks so much. Please help me welcome Tim to the show. Hey, Tim, welcome to the show.
Tim:Well, thanks for having me today, Mike.
Mike:Yeah, absolutely. Glad you’re here. And I’m excited for the topic we’re going to talk about today.
Tim:I am too. I am so glad to have the opportunity to speak on your show today.
Mike:Yeah.
Tim:Thank you.
Mike:Yeah, and I know the message that you teach and we’re going to share with everybody here but generally speaking, you know, I think there’s a lot of people that get started in real estate investing or that are in real estate investing, they get caught up in the hype of volume and, you know, their goals when they get into it are very . . . not that you can’t change your goals along the way in life, but it’s just ego gets in the way and people are focused on volume or taking on a lot of unnecessary risks instead of necessarily just building a business that supports their lifestyle. So it’s going to be exciting.
Tim:Yes.
Mike:Yeah, yeah. Well, hey, before we jump in, tell us a little bit about your background and kind of how you got to where you are today?
Tim:It’s been a long, long path. I’ve been in real estate for about 20 years. Got involved early on after I got out of college. I never wanted to be a nine to fiver. My dad was a farmer. I grew up on a farm long days, always wanted to control your destiny. So I knew I had to go to work, get a job. So I went to college. I was the first in my family to go to Mizzou. I went up there, participated in all the fun things. It was party central, party college of the world at that point, walked on and played a little track, ran track and got my officers, ROTC.
Graduated in business and I started working for Aldi [SP] Food, and it was wonderful. Did that for a whole two years and quit and went into network marketing. Did almost every aspect of network marketing—Amway, locally. Did different things and just learned to speak to people and figure out what they wanted out of life and found out that that wasn’t going to support the family.
So went back to work for a QuikTrip [SP], which is a fine organization. And a guy came in one day and showed me a check for $36,000. I was like, “Wow, would you do because you’re in here every single day, so I know you didn’t earn it.” And he said, “Well, if you get some time I’ll sit down with you and show you what I did.” And he wanted to meet at the Ritz Carlton, which I thought was really wow because he was very plain dressed guy, always wore a weapon on the side and turned out he was a convenience store owner. But he was very, very well connected in the community and did a lot of real estate. So I sat down with him, and he shared with me for a little while about the different techniques and how he purchased property and he says, “Tim, you just got to go out and buy property.” I’m like, “Okay.”
So that next Saturday I went to the Office Depot, you know, where they get the contract that says your name goes here and their name goes right here. And I just went driving around South St. Louis and found a house for sale by owner. I acted like I knew what I was talking about. I had Wite-Out all over the paper and come to find out, that property took me five months to close. It was a part of an estate. There was a minor involved. Somebody was in prison. Somebody owed taxes. And I happened to spend $1,000 doing some investigation and, you know, had inspections done. I’m a cheap guy, so I didn’t want to lose my investment. So I’m, like, “I’m going to keep fighting through this thing until I get this property.” And ended up buying the property. I rehabbed it part time myself and sold it and made $15,000, and I just got the bug, and it kind of went from there.
Mike:Yeah, yeah. It often starts that way, right, for a lot of people. It’s just you kind of have the bug and then when you get one, it’s like blood in the water. You just want to do more.
Tim:It was. It was.
Mike:Yeah. Well, and then so I guess, you know, one of the things we’re going to talk about today, a big part of, really, I guess the overall theme for today is that a lot of real estate investors, you know, sometimes what happens is, as you stair step through this business, like you’re doing a deal a month, then you’re doing two or three, then you’re doing four or five, what happens is you start to layer in lots of costs and lots of risk and start to spend more time away from family and a lot of times, right, some, not everybody. Honestly, the goal is always to work yourself out of a job, but a lot of people just end up owning the job, right?
Tim:Exactly.
Mike:Not having the lifestyle they want. So kind of share your thoughts. Set the tone for this conversation for us.
Tim:Well, that’s one of the things that I’m working with right now is helping people walk through the sexy TV idea right now, which is everybody wants to be a flipper. And I go to those three days shows that come into town blow in and blow out. And they’re often left with the idea of it’s real easy to make money and make wealth in real estate. And I try to separate that and help people understand what personality do you have that matches up with one of the three major forms that I think we’re all shifted or guided between and it’s wholesaling, flipping, or buying and holding property.
And I have a distinct idea that two of the options are jobs. Either you own them, or you can turn them into businesses, but you constantly have to repeat them, which is the wholesaling or the rehabbing. Really the only one that has passive income or at least is closest to passive income is your rental portfolio. And then within there, there’s a ton of questions I try to ask them to see which direction really fits them.
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Tim: . . . which is everybody wants to be a flipper and I go to those three days shows that come into town blow in and blow out. And they’re often left with the idea of it’s real easy that to make money and make wealth in real estate. And I try to separate that and help people understand what personality do you have that matches up with one of the three major forms that I think we’re all shifted or guided between and it’s wholesaling, flipping, or buying and holding property.
Mike:Yep.
Tim:And I have a distinct idea that two of the options are jobs, either you own them or you can turn them into businesses, but you constantly have to repeat them, which is the wholesaling or the rehabbing. Really the only one that has passive income or at least is closest to passive income is your rental portfolio. And then within their there’s a ton of questions I try to ask them to see which direction really fits them.
Mike:Yeah, yeah, and it’s interesting that, you know, some folks I will say universally and when we . . . I do a lot of coaching and mentoring. I do a lot of events here locally. And from the beginning, we we’re different because we talk about how hard this business is. Like, this is a difficult business, and I just want to set that context for people. This is a great business. It’s been great for me. It’s been great for my family. I know a lot of people it’s changed lives for, no doubt. But the one thing it is never is easy.
Tim:Right. It’s not complicated.
Mike:Right. Yeah, it’s not difficult to understand. It’s just not easy, right? There’s just something new that comes your way every day or every week that you got to deal with that you’d never expected, right?
Tim:And unfortunately, I believe I started in the most difficult part which was rehabbing. There’s a lot of moving parts to that, and it’s sexy on TV, but you only see the 20-minute version. I have yet to have a house flip in 20 minutes. So there’s a whole lot of other things that go with that process that takes a little bit longer than 20 minutes, and the thing that you’re left with also in a TV show, you never see labor show up on anybody’s diagram. So the things that are critical in the coaching that I come across is, like you said, the describing and laying out the whole process. And it’s generally a six-month process for our brand new person, the way I teach it, because I walked beside them, help them understand it and experience it themselves so that they have a true understanding of the process without seeing them fall off the cliff.
Mike:Right, right. And I think, you know, you grew up in St. Louis. I grew up in the Midwest or you’re in the St. Louis area now. And I think that there are . . . you know, there’s something about real estate investors that when we you get started, most and even after that, a lot of real estate investors are just cheap, right? We’re kind of frugal and the thing is, is our whole business is buying stuff at a deep discount, so we’re just cheap and negotiating everything. And what happens for a lot of real estate investors is they end up cheating out on getting stuff done to the point to where they’re doing more of it than they should, right?
Tim:Oh, man. You’re saying so much. There’s a book that I wrote, “How I Met God In Real Estate.” And there was one of the chapters was, “Tim put your tools away.” And in that aspect I did it. One of the goals was to get rid of my vehicle, my truck. And the thought was if I stopped with the pickup truck, I would stop working side by side with my employees, and that worked for a while. And then I downsize to a van. And then, you know, you get an Odyssey, you can actually get a four by eight sheet of drywall in the back of that thing. And then that was a problem. Then I got a Highlander now with a hitch on it, which I can pull a trailer. The next is it has to be a car with no hitch that I definitely break away from that idea that, “Well, it’s great, but I still need to do some finishing touches with you.” It’s a hard thing to break.
Mike:You just have to get a Vespa. You have a little scooter and yeah.
Tim:That might do the trick.
Mike:Yeah. So let’s talk about, you know, some of the mistakes that you think kind of early on a lot of new real estate investors make, and some of it is just the mindset of here’s where I want to get which . . . I mean, look at I think most real estate investors if you talk to them and sat them down up front, “What would you like?” You know, let’s talk about cash flow, passive income, and let’s also be honest here that rental properties are never as passive as what most people lead them on to be. But it is true that they do create a recurring revenue stream unlike wholesaling or rehabbing. But most people you could show a path of how you get there with buy and hold, yet most people will take the harder route and jump into wholesaling and rehabbing first.
Tim:I tell you the first place that I start is personal clarity. What is it that you really, really want out of life? And what are you willing to give in exchange for that? Once they really truly understand who they are and the things that they like and dislike and the skills and ability that they have, some people can’t communicate with you. Some people hate to have that conversational argument, shall we say, “No, you did not install the hot water heater the way I asked you, and now I’m not going to pay you for that.” Some people will not have that.
I had one student, you know, I said, “You need to fire your contractor.” And she said, “Well, will you go with me?” And I said, “No.” You know, so she took her father with her. So there’s different things you got to do and get past, but you have to understand yourself and how you’re going to respond based on what that job is going to require, whether you’re wholesaling, or you’re doing short sales, you know, it doesn’t fit your personality.
And the other thing people don’t always understand is all the resources that are available to them are resources they’re going to need in order to be successful. If you’re going to do the [first 00:13:30] system, for example, and you have bad credit and you can’t qualify for a loan, that’s probably not the model that you want to follow in order to be successful. Not that you can accumulate rentals, but you’re going to have to do it a different way. So it’s critical that you understand. And people often say, “Well, I’ve been studying real estate for years,” and they may have, they’ve been attending RIAs, but they haven’t been asking the right questions.
Tim:Yeah.
Mike:It’s a very different animal when you actually start doing it.
Tim:Yes.
Mike:But truthfully, that’s the only way you can learn is to start doing it, right?
Tim:You just have to jump off into it just like I did. You just go and you fake it till you make it, but it can be damaging that way. I mean, you and I both would agree that a coach or a mentor would probably be a much wiser investment. You’re going to spend a whole lot less money, and your learning curve almost evaporates. And then find that you get from where you want to be to where you desire to be is so shortened.
Mike:Yeah, yeah. How about this belief that some people just try to do one deal at a time and they’re like, you know, “If you’re advertising to generate leads, for example, I’m going to advertise and when I get a deal, I’m going to stop advertising, then I’m going to fix that up, and I’m going to wait till I sell it. And then I’m going to start the whole process again.”
Tim:Oh, man, you hit it. I call that the plan that never works. I’ve seen it many, many times. It’s come to me. I started coaching that way in the beginning, even lived it out myself. But what I found was the time it takes to accumulate and find a good deal . . . I mean, St. Louis, there’s hedge funds all over the place, so you’re finding a good deal that you can actually make some real money on is hard now. I like the, you know, one base at a time, 15, 20 grand. But what happens is life. I have three girls going to college, you get a project finished, and you said, “Oh, wow this 30,000, 40,000 is going to go real long way.” And then, you know, the tuition guy calls and said, You know, “I’ll gladly take that $10,000 off your hand.”
So now you only left with a third of it. And you’ve not had a paycheck for four months or so since you’re fixing that hab or rehabbing house one at a time. So you got living expenses, and you’re left with maybe 10 grand. Well, it’s hard to buy an investment property for $10,000. So now you stretch that out three or four more months, and you accumulate 30 grand into one year, but that’s not enough to sustain and keep the cash flow going that you need. So it often falls into the problem of, “It didn’t work for me.” So they stop when really they just had the wrong plan.
Mike:Yeah, yeah. Let’s talk a little bit about like exit strategies. And I agree with you, you know, when we coach and we teach the fundamentals wholesaling rehabbing and buy and hold and there’s lots of different trains of thoughts. There’s no right or wrong here. Sometimes, honestly, what we teach is in the process of doing other things, you’re going to come across great opportunities for rentals so kind of pack those away. And someday you won’t have to work so hard. And there’s some people that say just go right to rentals, you know, build up that cash flow and, you know, there’s a whole mixture of ideas about how to get there. But let’s just talk generally about the importance of building up some cash flowing assets.
Tim:I believe that there are two phases of your life. You know, one is your expenses equal your passive income or your number rentals. You know, where you currently are . . . say you live and you need $3,000 worth of money to live each month comfortably. It’s an option point that your strike-even point. So you need say five rental properties or six rental properties giving you $500 worth of cash flow, that gives you options. It doesn’t mean necessarily that you quit working your job or do anything like that. But now you got breathing room and maybe you haven’t liked the job you’ve been in.
But now you want to make a career change into a job that you do enjoy that you could work less in, but you really are enjoying what you’re passionate about. So it just augments your lifestyle, but it gives you an opportunity. Now you can build some real cash and maybe some pick up, continue to pick up investment properties or learn wholesaling, or like you say, flip some deals. But it gives you a choice without saying, “I quit my job, and now I’ve got to earn all the income that I had before.” And that’s something not wise options some people have done. I did I just jump out and I had . . .
Mike:I did too. I did too. But when I look back, it’s like there’s . . . if I could name my regrets, it’s I wish I had started investing in real estate earlier. This is all things I can’t change, right? I wish I had kept . . . I’ve done hundreds of houses and I kept, you now, 10% or 15% of them as rentals. Like, I wish I had kept more as rentals. You know, it’s like in hindsight, if I had kept another 100 rentals, like, just with the appreciation we’ve had and the cash flow that these things are starting to pay off as they throw off as they get paid down, it’s like, man, I wish I had kept more of those. So those are kind of my two biggest universal regrets I’d say.
Tim:And I would agree with that as well. There’s one that I would say that is probably overarching for me is that real estate is cyclical. It runs in cycles and that we’re possibly due for one soon, but you need to be money to up when that cycle hits because everything goes on sale and the bankers refuse to give you investment dollars when all of the properties just went to 50%. I never understand that. It’s half of what you’ve been lending on up into the last 90 days, and now you won’t invest in a half price item. We know it’s coming back. So that’s the part I wish I had known earlier is that get moneyed-up when you’re at the top of the cycle because when it crashes, you get to run in and be the hero and take everything at 50% on the dollar.
Mike:Yeah. Yeah. In terms of how do people . . . what do you advise or how do you advise people when they’re talking about building up some passive income from rental properties or some ongoing cash flow? How do they decide? Is it as simple as saying, “Well, this is going to cash flow this many dollars a month and, you know, let’s just start by replacing your income?” Or how do people figure out like how much they need to offset costs? And you can get academic about it, but you and I both know like things happen along the way that you didn’t plan for, and how do you kind of advise people to just step into that?
Tim:I’m a very simple person with very simple ideas. So it’s real simple. First, I’m finding out what type of investment property do you like? Do you like lower in, you know, like CD quality properties like I do, or do you like the I can feel safe and take my kids by my house? Or do I want an asset that really will appreciate? And then can they buy any of those? So then once I determine that is like, what’s the average cash flow in any one of those properties? And you simply divide that by the number or the dollar amount that you need for expenses. So, you know, $5,000, most people need 25 to 50 houses. Okay, so now how are we going to accomplish that?
And then we set out with a plan on how to do that. And it may be that, like you said, there’s things you learn over time. You start with the initial plan in place, but you run across all kinds of things if you’re in real estate. You’re going to run across that beautiful wholesale deal that you really doesn’t fit your model, but you can sell and make some money. You’re going to scrape up and run into a rehab that, wow, it’s just you just can’t pass up and you do. So there’s all of those things that come into play, but we have an initial plan in place that we’re trying to accomplish knowing that those things are going to come up, and when they do, let’s get good counsel and decide what’s the best way to take advantage.
Mike:Yeah, that’s great. And we even teach and I believe I practice this too, is this is a fairly easy business to reverse engineer. Like I want to be here and I’m starting here, what are the steps I need to take along the way? And, you know, we focus a lot on lead generation because we advertise, and that’s how we generate leads in our business. But even if you’re buying them off the MLS, which is not necessarily something that I advise. It depends on the market. But, you know, it’s like, “Hey, if I want to buy one house a quarter or one house a month, I need to look at five or I need to look at 20,” whatever the number is if you’re advertising or you’re just making offers.
Like, you know, you can start to reverse engineer, certainly make assumptions. I need to make this many offers to get this many deals. And if my goal is to get this many deals in a year, like that’s one per month or whatever it might be, whatever it is. So if people kind of hold themselves accountable and responsible or if you have a coach or mentor that helps you with that, then you’ll know every week I need to be doing these activities and that will take me one step closer to my quarterly goal and then to my annual goal, right?
Tim:That definitely is the plan. Where some people can get caught up is that you get the one deal that you’ve been advertising for the leads for and then you’re working on it. And you forget that I need to continue marketing because when I stop and I step back, and then I’m finished with the house, that’s great. Oh, no, I don’t have my next project lined up. So you need a mentor walking beside you and says continually do what you do that was successful because that will run itself and the course, you know, you’ll be finished and now you need that next project. So that’s something I see in this kind of a stage one investor is realizing that you have to constantly keep feeding this machine and that you constantly need to replace yourself with more of the team to help you facilitate your dream.
Mike:Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. So let’s talk a little bit about, as I know we talked about this briefly before we started today, about kind of quantity. You know, at the end of the day, the goal is cash flow or cash flow coming in, but some people have this kind of have two trains of thoughts. I’m going to lever up my houses as high as I can and just get a ton of them, or I’m going to focus on paying down debt and I don’t need to have as many because each one is throwing off more cash flow. Maybe share your thoughts on that.
Tim:I worked for a gentleman who his goal was to have 150 houses paid off in 20 years and my philosophy was similar to that. My goal when I first started was to have 50 houses paid off by age 45 setback, you know, $20,000 a month coming in, ski the slope while I was still able and not be able to run into trees and take myself out. But have since changed that idea to be more of a debt free investor where I do partnership investing. And I think that goes back to you had to really find out yourself and what your core beliefs really are. Also the time horizon that you’ve got in order to accomplish that mission as well. So I teach both methods, but I really think it comes down to your core personality and what works best for you and also your spouse. I mean, the spouse weighs in heavily on that as well as to what their comfort zone is. Kids going to college.
There’s lots of things that play into it. But I think once again, you have to get good instruction on the process either way, and it’s not bad if you have to adjust your plan halfway through. That’s the thing with real estate. Like you said, you can reverse engineer it. You’re not locked into anything at any time. And also the market will sometimes dictate what you need to do because they’ve stopped lending or you just run into . . . you move and there’s just like, you can’t even pick them up fast enough. So change your agenda. So it all is dependent on being able to sense and be aware of what’s around you and what’s happening. And I think that’s sometime just as important as what is my initial plan and how do I plan on carrying it out.
Mike:Yeah, that’s great. You just said something that I think was . . . I really want people to understand here because you’ve been investing for 20 years so you’ve been through several cycles. And I’ve been an investor for about 11 years, so I’ve been through a couple cycles here. But I know, like you said, you want to get, using your phrase, moneyed-up. If you want to get start building up cash reserves or getting access to cash from other investors so that you can go shop when everything’s on sale. So that is powerful, right? But I want to talk about how your exit strategies might change in different market cycles.
And I don’t know if everybody, you know, if you haven’t been through a couple cycles, this might sound a little new, right? But like right now, and it depends on what market you’re in too. So Dallas is historically a great rental market, but the retail market where I’m at right now is on fire and so, you know, when it’s a sellers’ market, we tend to lean into selling activities and when it’s a buyers’ market, we tend to do more buying and buy and hold. But just talk about how to, people that are listening now, how to kind of anticipate those cycles and how things generally might shift in terms of your exit strategies or how you operate your business?
Tim:It’s kind of scary sometimes. Like I said, I suffered the first time. I didn’t know that disciple came and suffered a bankruptcy. I was not prepared for that. My goal, I told you where I was headed. In 2005, really felt the Lord telling me, you know, sell everything off, be debt free, and teach other people to be debt free. So I started that process early 2005 and I was halfway through to my goal. I started just selling off everything I could rapidly and got down to the last three properties. And actually, it was at Sean’s retreat and had submitted a short sale for the last three properties to this bank. And unbeknownst to me, the FDIC had come in and shut the bank down that I was making to payments to on Friday.
So the new bank comes in and says, “Okay, here’s what we’re going to do. You pay me everything back, and everything is good.” And the properties were worth one third of the value. So that wasn’t a real good exit plan either. So the thing is adjusting and understanding the market, understand the market and that is so key because what happens is you can get sucked up into what’s happening in the excitement. And right now, I’m a little nervous with what I see, as what you said, the retail market’s going up. When the banks start lending to you without good sense, the young people start running into the market and buying and overpaying for property hoping that I’m going to catch that last little retail sales house and then when the market drops, you’re stuck with that $700,000, $800,000 house that was supposed to go up to $900,000.
And now you’re bleeding income because you want to sell it at any price but you’re into it for 800 and it’s only worth 500, that’s the part that will teach you like no other teacher you’ve ever had before to be aware that the market has cycles. So that’s when I think you learn about exit programs after the fact as opposed to before the fact. Unless you have a mentor like you who’s seen a few and says you might want to be a little cautious, play it . . . and I tend to run from the direction everybody else is running to.
Mike:That’s a sign of somebody who’s been through some market cycles, right? I mean . . .
Tim:You got to have a little wisdom when everybody is running out there saying I’m going to buy the next house and it’s like, “Whoa, pump the brakes, pump the brakes a little bit. You might just want to be cautious. Be wise. You can always pick up rentals if they’re based on, you know, a good rate that you’re able to pick up the property. You still got good margin in the cash flow.” That’s always a wise investment. But it’s all about really watching the market and understanding those little things that make you nervous and listening to them. Don’t run past those things that you know are boundary markers that you’ve established for yourself that always get you in trouble. Don’t get greedy. Real estate will always smack you down when you get greedy.
Mike:No doubt. You got to be careful. Yeah, like a market like now, like, we don’t know . . . you know, I was having conversations with people two or three years ago about when is the market shifts coming. It’s got to become . . . you know, I’m playing an economist. I’m like, “I don’t know. Sometime in the next 12 months though I think we’re going to have a cycle.” It’s like of course that came and went and, I don’t know. At this point, I could say this, I have no idea when it’s going to be, but what I do know is it’s going to hit high end markets first and even in your own market, it’s going to start to hit higher end houses, which Dallas is on fire, but we’re seeing softening above like a half million. We’re seeing softening.
You know, 3,000 to 500,000 is softer. The first time homebuyer stuff still seems to be chugging away. But those are signs that something is changing, right? So you just have to be prepared. Like don’t have blinders on to that stuff because it’s going to happen. It doesn’t mean the market’s going to crash, but you don’t need it to crash to get wiped out.
Tim:Right. Right. You only have to have the wrong plan.
Mike:Right, right. Yeah.
Tim:But once again, you adjust even. You know, my situation, you crash and burn. You still come back out because there’s nothing that it can take away from you that you still know how to rehab a house. You still know how to work private money. I mean, for the last 10 years, I’ve had to work in a private money raising, you know, your own funds. And there’s always somebody who wants to make an investment and make an improvement on their money. You know, 1% in your CD is not exciting to anyone.
So when you’re sharing and saying, “Hey, we can come and partner on this deal. There is some risk, but it’s going to be six to seven times better than that CD rate that you’re investing in. And you’re going to get position and all the other stuff.” So I’ve learned that there’s always an opportunity no matter what the market is if you understand what people’s desires are and you got win-win, you know, creating situations like that.
Mike:That’s fantastic. Awesome. Awesome. Well, Tim, hey thanks for sharing some great knowledge with us today.
Tim:Yeah. It’s been wonderful.
Mike:Yeah. Hey, if folks want to learn more about you or wanted to reach out to you or get a hold of you, where would they go?
Tim:Our website is hafpinc.com and my email address is tim@hafpinc.com. And you can call me direct because I’m old school and, you know, my phone I use primarily to talk to people. And that’s (314) 283-6022. And we love to talk even if I just can help you out in any way. More that [inaudible 00:31:23]
Mike:Awesome. Awesome. And I’m not sure if we said it up front, if you’re in St. Louis you should definitely contact him because that’s where he’s in St. Louis area. So we’ll add the information Tim just gave us down below in the show notes here for those of you that are driving and didn’t get to write that down. But everybody, this is episode number 433 with my friend, Tim, here. Great information on being prepared and truthfully running a real estate investing business that helps support the lifestyle that you want to live. It shouldn’t be about anything other than that. A lot of times we start chest thumping, and we see like somebody is doing 10 times the volume than us, and we go pursue something bigger and better just for ego getting in the way.
But at its core, real estate investing can provide really a great foundation for your family and your lifestyle, and that’s what you should focus on, first and foremost. Everybody has different goals, but that is kind of foundational where you need to start. So episode number 433. We’re going to keep them coming at you guys. If you haven’t yet, please subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play, anywhere where you could watch or see us. Of course you can watch all of our episodes on flipnerd.com. We’d appreciate a positive review on any of those platforms if you haven’t given it to us yet. So I appreciate you guys. We’re going to keep them coming at you. We’ll see on the next show.
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