This is episode #414, and my guest today is Brad Woodall, an Atlanta based real estate investor.

I met Brad after he joined my Investor Fuel real estate mastermind. He’s a great guy…and at the time, was still working full time, and investing on the side. After a year or so and starting to ramp up his business, he learned that his job was in the way of his investing business.

That’s when he knew it was time to quit his job to focus full time on investing. If you’re new or newer to real estate investing, you’ll appreciate this conversation. Even if you’ve been in the business for a while, but maybe stuck in your growth, you’ll enjoy today’s show. Sometimes you just need a ‘do over’, maybe this episode is it!

Please help me welcome Brad Woodall to the show!

Highlights of this show

  • Meet Brad Woodall, Atlanta based real estate investor.
  • Learn how Brad made the decision to leave his Job to focus full time on real estate investing.
  • Join our conversation about how to eliminate doubt in your mind that can kill your chances of success.

Resources and Links from this show:

Listen to the Audio Version of this Episode

FlipNerd Show Transcript:

Mike: This is the flipnerd.com Expert Real Estate Investing Show, the show for real estate investors, whether you’re a veteran or brand new. I’m your host, Mike Hambright, and each week I bring you a new expert guest that will share their knowledge and lessons with you. If you’re excited about real estate investing, believe in personal responsibility, and taking control of your life and financial destiny, you’re in the right place.
This is episode number 414, and my guest today is Brad Woodall, an Atlanta-based real estate investor. I met Brad after he joined my Investor Fuel Real Estate Mastermind. He’s a great guy, and at the time he was still working full time and investing on the side. Pretty typical scenario. After a year or so, he started to ramp up his business and he learned that his job was in the way of his investing business. That’s when he knew it was time to quit his job to focus full time on real estate investing. Maybe you can resonate with that.
If you’re new or newer to real estate investing, I think you’re going to appreciate this conversation and get a lot out of today’s show. Even if you’ve been in the business for a while, maybe if you’re stuck in your growth, not moving forward as fast as you would like or doing as many deals as you would like, I think you’re going to get a lot out of today’s show. Sometimes you just need a do-over, maybe, and maybe this episode is it. Maybe that will be the catalyst to help you take it to another level. Please help me welcome Brad Woodall to the show. Hey, Brad. Welcome to the show.
Brad: Hey, Mike. How are you?
Mike: Good, good. I’m excited to have you on today. Kind of similar to some other shows we’ve had lately, we’re talking about how to take real estate investing seriously. A lot of folks want to jump in or have jumped in, but didn’t really do it the right way, and end up kind of getting frustrated, maybe failing. A lot of times failing before they even get started really. You’ve kind of made some transitions from a job into a full time real estate investor here just this year, so you’re going to have some great experiences to share with us.
Brad: Absolutely.
Mike: Before we get started here, why don’t you tell folks your background a little bit so we can learn a little bit more about you.
Brad: Yeah. So I am here in the Atlanta market, Atlanta, Georgia. I live north of Atlanta, but I focus mostly north of I-20 and up, all the way up into the mountains. That’s kind of my farm area, which is a pretty large area. But I recently became a full time investor back in January, middle of January this year, 2018. I worked in the corporate world for many, many years. My corporate background, I was doing a lot of fraud investigations, data analysis, loss prevention, asset protection, all that sort of stuff.
Mike: Sexy stuff.
Brad: Yeah, catching bad guys is what we say to just normal people. I loved doing that, but after a while I just kind of got burned out on it, because you do it for so long. I really always loved real estate. I wanted to get into flipping back in the heyday of the early 2000s and I never took any action. My only action was to buy a house to live in to flip, and I bought that in October of ’07, and we know how that turned out.
Mike: Yeah.
Brad: I’m married. I have two little kids. I’ve got a 3-year-old and a 9-month-old. That’s kind of my background there. I’m in my early 30s.
Mike: Yeah. Awesome, awesome. When you decided to leave your job, so you were doing some deals last year and you joined our Investor Fuel Mastermind group. One of the things that we do in our group for folks that are not members here is we focus a lot on accountability, so what is it that you want to accomplish. We have our meetings quarterly. So in the next 90 days, what is it that you’re going to accomplish, and you kind of laid down the gauntlet and said, “I’m going to quit my job and go all in and focus on this.” So talk about kind of why you did that, and maybe why you didn’t do it sooner, and how you finally kind of made that decision, I guess.
Brad: So why I didn’t do it sooner is because I’m married, and I like to stay married and I like to keep my wife happy. I would have done it.
Mike: You don’t make all the decisions.
Brad: Right.
Mike: Yeah, okay.
Brad: I wanted to make sure she was comfortable with it. I did my first deal in October of 2016. I got started really seriously setting up marketing and stuff like that, and really making offers on properties in May 2016, and it was about October when I finally got my first deal. Then 2017, I was doing deals on the side, still working my corporate job, and it got to the point where my job was getting in the way of real estate investing. And that’s when I knew it was time to quit. When I was spending money on marketing and I couldn’t go out on appointments, and it’s super important to go on appointments to get these deals, to get in front of people. When I couldn’t do it because my job was in the way, that’s when I knew, all right, I’ve got to quit.
Mike: Yeah. And you had done enough deals at that point to know that, hey, I can replace my income if I focus on this. Right?
Brad: Yeah. My proof of concept was fine. And fortunately my wife works a very good paying corporate job, and we had kind of saved up some money. I had a little bit of runway there to do it, and I told her, “Look, just give me some time and I can do it.”
Mike: Yeah, yeah. I guess it was just the job getting in the way, that’s kind of what made the timing right. So what happened after that? For anybody that’s ever lost a job, I mean you quit your job voluntarily.
Brad: I’ve lost one before, too. Yeah.
Mike: But for anybody that’s ever lost a job, and it’s been a long time for me. Well I’m unemployable now. I’ve been a real estate investor for 10 years. But there was a time when I lost a job, and I didn’t know what to do with myself. I was looking for a job, but that’s not a full time job. When you get out and you’re trying to be a real estate investor, sometimes when you go from doing it . . . What happens is you’re doing deals. You were doing deals before you quit your job. So you have a job, and you have another job, effectively, as a real estate investor. So you were very efficient. You found a way to work hard whenever you had to. Then all of a sudden all this free time opens up. I don’t know if you were a 40-hour-a-week type guy or a 50 to 60-hour-a-week type guy in your job, but all of a sudden you have 40, 50, 60 hours a week that you didn’t have before. And it’s a little intimidating.
Brad:Oh, yeah.
Mike: It’s like, what am I supposed to do with all this time. Right?
Brad: Absolutely. No, for sure. You got to focus.
Mike: Talk about that. Talk about that a little bit. Let’s talk about that transition.
Brad: Obviously, we’re entrepreneurs, and that’s probably every entrepreneur’s number one struggle is focus, because we all have shiny object syndrome. One thing that I did was just basically tried to focus on the things that are going to generate the most amount of the biggest return. Obviously marketing. When I first got started, I jumped right into this and it was January. Here in Atlanta and across other markets, it was kind of slow until about March. And there’s some self-doubt right there about your decision.
But I focused on getting my marketing set up in that time period as soon as I quit, and I put a lot of focus into, all right what kind of . . . I’d always been doing pay-per-click marketing, and I’ve found that was a good way for me to do a full time job on that, because I could manage the lead flow. Pay-per-click versus direct mail, you’ve got to deal with all the calls and all that, and build more systems. So I chose to go that route.
So then I said, all right, I’ve got to do other forms of marketing. I got back into direct mail, I got back into doing other stuff, and just had to focus on that. And then building the systems out. We mentioned our goals that we recorded at Investor Fuel. One of my goals was to build out the systems, to make sure that I’ve got all this stuff documented, because you’re doing all this stuff in your head, but getting it on paper is the hard part. So I focused a lot of time on defining this stuff. In that process, I hired a VA to help me, and I’ve got a pretty good thing going with the VA now. We’ve got a good little rhythm going. You know, just focusing on things that are generating activity. And now I have the time to go on appointments. So I’m probably going on a lot more appointments than I need to, but right now I’m just going out on all the appointments and getting in front of people, and then later I can pick and choose my appointments.
If you’re an active real estate investor already doing deals, and looking to double or triple your business, you should consider joining the Investor Fuel Real Estate Investor Mastermind. We’re a small group of investors that share our best practices, tips, and tricks with one another in an effort to all win. We limit our membership to only one to two members per market so everyone shares their knowledge, tips, and tricks openly and honestly. Our members include some buying one to two houses a month, up to some of the most respected investors and leaders in the real estate investing industry, some of which have personally done over 1,000 deals. If you’d like to be considered for our invitation only world class mastermind, please visit investorfuel.com to request your personal invitation. Our next meeting is coming up quickly. Go to investorfuel.com now to learn more.
Brad: Doing other stuff, and just had to focus on that. And then building the systems out. We mentioned our goals that we recorded at Investor Fuel. One of my goals was to build out the systems, to make sure that I’ve got all this stuff documented, because you’re doing all this stuff in your head, but getting it on paper is the hard part. So I focused a lot of time on defining this stuff. In that process, I hired a VA to help me, and I’ve got a pretty good thing going with the VA now. We’ve got a good little rhythm going. You know, just focusing on things that are generating activity. And now I have the time to go on appointments. So I’m probably going on a lot more appointments than I need to, but right now I’m just going out on all the appointments and getting in front of people, and then later I can pick and choose my appointments.
Mike: Yeah. Obviously, I coach and mentor a lot of folks. That’s one of the things we say is when you’re new, and if you’ve got all that time, just get in front of people. Nothing happens sitting in your home office or in a Starbucks on your laptop. You’ve got to do some administrative things, but you’ve got to get used to getting in front of people and making offers over and over again for sure. So that’s the right move.
Do you design your day? Ultimately, you don’t want to own a job. You want to have a business and have employees and people to help you with things, so you’re not having to do all the running. Of course, initially you’ve got to get there. Right? You’ve got to get over that hurdle, you got to be able to afford them. Do you try to design your day? I know you’ve got young kids, obviously. Do you try to design it like a job? Like hey, I’m going to start at 8:00, or I’m going to start at 9:00, and I’m going to work until this time? Or do you find that you’re just working all the time?
Brad: Because I have little kids, the way my day typically starts is . . . You know, I’d love to do this 5:00 am wake up, but sometimes my kids wake up at 5:00 am. So I don’t have time. Typically I take them to school about 7:45, 8:00. Their daycare — because they’re little — is about five minutes away from our house. So I’m back home. I have an office in my basement, and I go down to my office and I sit down and I work. I’m generally down here about 8:10, 8:15 in the morning. And then basically I know to end my day at about 4:30, I leave here and I go pick them up from daycare.
Then after they go to bed at night, I do a little bit of work in the evenings about 8:00, 9:00 at night. I’ll work for an hour or two and then go to bed. So I get most in during the day, and then a little bit at night. And then I’ll sit down every evening and kind of write out what I need to do for the next day. I always have one thing on my list as some . . . I need to be putting effort towards taking a hat off. This week, we were talking about it beforehand, I got to get a job posting out for an acquisitions manager, so I’ve been working this week. Which my kid got sick, so that kind of got put on the back burner a little bit. But my goal next week is to have the posting out by the end of the week, and so I’ve got to every day be putting a little bit into that posting so I can get that posting out there and get an acquisitions manager.
Mike: Yeah. And just knowing you and how systematic you are in your approach –people can probably tell this by listening — part of what you’re doing is you’re also building a process for the next time you have to hire somebody. That’ll be easier, right? You have the job listing, and you just get a process for post it here, post it there, and here’s how applications come in. Things like that. Are you using Podio for your CRM?
Brad: I don’t.
Mike: You don’t? Okay. Not that it matters. I know we shared some stuff inside of our mastermind group. It took us many years, but eventually we just . . . Of course, when I first started, Podio didn’t exist. But we use Podio for our CRM. Whatever CRM we use, we just basically built a form inside of there that people have to apply. They fill out an application in our CRM, the same CRM that we use for our house buying business. So we kind of have an HR component inside of there. So anytime we have to hire somebody, we have a link. Like here’s the job description to apply, click this link. It goes right into our CRM, and then we have a process. Would you say that you’re systematic in your approach like that? Whenever you’re doing these things, you’re constantly looking down the road to say, I’m learning how to do this, but I’m going to make this easier for myself as time goes by as well.
Brad: Yeah. And part of that goes into my background. For many years in the corporate world I did data analytics. I’m an SQL “Sequel” guru, databases, all of that. I’m always thinking in terms of . . .
Mike: That’s how you got your wife, right? She was like, the SQL guy. That’s the guy I want.
Brad: No.
Mike: Kidding. I’m kidding.
Brad: I know, I know. So I’m always thinking in terms of, all right, like you said with the form. And I actually found out I can build a form on my website just like the one you’ve done at Podio. So I’m going to go that route and I can export it into CSB and drop it somewhere else. So I’m always thinking in terms of data, because data makes life easier later, and how you can analyze that data later. So yeah, I do think that way in terms of how it’s going to . . . And then also, one thing I’ve found that I like to do is I do a lot of screen recordings of all the things I do.
Mike: Yeah, that’s awesome.
Brad: Even if I’m not building a process today, if I catch myself doing something I’ll just record it and save it on my computer, so I can go back to it later. That’s how I’ve taught my VA to do a lot of things.
Mike: Absolutely.
Brad: Because I know how to do all this stuff. I’m an Excel wizard, all that stuff. I make the video first, then I just upload it to the Google Drive. Watch this, this is how you do it. And then he watches it, and he can watch it as many times as he wants, and then he figures out how to do it.
Mike: That’s perfect. Yeah. And I hope the people that are newer that are listening to this, honestly even people that have been around a long time, a lot of even veteran real estate investors don’t do things like that. Everything you do, you’re creating a standard operating procedure for. It takes more work. It’s a pain in the butt. But it’ll allow you eventually to not have to do that anymore if somebody else can do it for you. Right?
Brad: Absolutely. If I can ever convince my wife to come work for me, she’s a project manager by trade, and if I get all this ready for her, I can have her organize it later and she can make it awesome.
Mike: Yeah, yeah. Like you said, there’s a lot of free tools you can use out there. We use Asana as like a task management tool for a checklist. Even the stuff we talked about filling out a form, you can do that for free inside of Google Docs. You can create a Google form and people can apply.
Brad: Really?
Mike: Oh, yeah. Totally.
Brad: I did not know that.
Mike: Yeah. Just go to create a document, and it’ll say create a form. It’s tied to a spreadsheet, so people fill it out and it just dumps it in there. Yeah. You can totally do that.
Brad: Huh. [inaudible 00:16:25]
Mike:You know, I encourage people that are new, or even if you’re not new, and you feel like every time you have to do anything in your business it’s just as hard the tenth time as it was the first time, then you need to work on documenting how to do these things and get more efficient and outsource it ultimately.
Brad: In my background in corporate world, whenever I was building something, I knew that if I have to do this more than twice, I need to figure out a way to automate it. Let it run on its own.
Mike: Right. So Brad, let’s talk a little bit about doubt and how to avoid it. I know when you left . . . Truthfully there’s a lot of people that have so much doubt that they never leave the job that they don’t want to be in anymore to jump into this. So there’s always that jump off point. And even if you have jumped off, a lot of times people start to question whether it’s going to work or not.
I’ve been coaching and mentoring people for almost ten years, and I’ve coined this phrase that I was sharing with some students today. The 90-day blues. So people get in, and it takes a while to start getting deals. It took me four months to get my first deal. It took you a few months once you started advertising. It’s just the nature of the business, especially in a market that’s as competitive as it is now.
Let’s just say, even if somebody was buying a house a month. That’s not a huge goal if you’re focused on this full time, for sure. What happens is, those other 29 days of the month when you didn’t buy a house, you’re just constantly thinking, am I doing something wrong? Am I unable to do this? Is my market too competitive? Is it a bad market? Is it a good market? Anything you can do to sabotage yourself, the human mind kind of does that. Right? So let’s talk about doubt a little bit and maybe how to avoid it.
Brad: Well you know, you talk about doubt. I took the dive full time in the middle of January. Early this year was really slow in Atlanta, and other people I’ve talked to it was really slow as well. I was getting a lot of doubt during that period, because I see money go out of my bank account for marketing, and I don’t see any money coming in. There were some deals that I had done towards the end of last year, and then a couple of them fell apart that I thought I was going to get income from. You know, it’s that income thing. But you know what, I stayed with it. I did some meditation exercises every night. That really helps to calm your brain down.
Mike: Yeah, awesome.
Brad: You look at other people that are doing it, and you’re like, oh man, this guy’s doing a bunch of deals. And you have to a) understand that . . . I heard this quote somewhere, it’s, “Don’t compare your first inning to someone’s else’s seventh inning.” Right?
Mike: There you go. Yeah, that’s awesome.
Brad: And you just have to keep thinking, all right. I just need to keep doing what I’m doing, trust the system, and it’ll work out. And it did. I think it was towards the end of February where I finally got my first property under contract for this year, but since then, I mean I got two under contract this week. So it’s really just snowballed in the last . . . And I’ve only been out of the job for 90 days now. Just in the last 45 days, it’s been insane.
Mike: That’s great. And it’s important for newer investors to realize, too, the idea of your pipeline. When you first start, or you just start lead generation activities, your pipeline’s empty. You’ve got to fill it up with people that might come around. It’s not uncommon with us. We just got a house under contract here in the past month. We generated that lead a year ago, and he said, no, I’m not interested in selling. Now we have it under contract. Then he called me the other day and he’s got another one he wants to sell. One, you’ve got to climb the learning curve of being a better closer from a sales perspective and building up your confidence. But also, the timing may not be right for those people that you meet today. That doesn’t mean it’s never going to be right, but you’ve got to get all those leads in your pipeline where you’re following up proactively with them, and eventually some of them will come back around. Right?
Brad: Absolutely, and that’s one thing I did early on when I first started, and that was something I had asked about at our last mastermind meeting. What are you guys doing for your follow-up systems? Because I had a lot of old leads in my CRM, so I implemented some things like automated follow-ups, and dropping Slybroadcast messages. And I got a few phone calls back from people, and that was nice.
Then even leads I’ve gotten in recently, and I did a little Facebook Live about this today, but you get some where they’re DOA and I get them in. Especially when you’ve got web leads. You’ll get some in, and they’re dark. You can’t get in touch with them. Just stay on top of them, stay on top of them. The house I got under contract two days ago, I stayed on top of them for like two weeks, and finally she responded, booked an appointment that day, and boom. I got it under contract for $30,000 less than what her asking price was.
Mike: Wow. That’s awesome. That’s awesome.
Brad: You just got to, like you said, stay with it and trust the system.
Mike: Yeah. I was just telling a story last night. I was doing an event for a bunch of new investors. Our record is we bought a house 54 months after we made our first offer. Four-and-a-half years. We just followed up almost every 30 days like clockwork, forever. Most of the time they didn’t answer the phone. We left a voicemail. We keep track of every single touch, so we have a whole lot of notes that say, “Called, left voicemail. Called, left voicemail.”
Our team sets another task, they call again in 30 days. And that went on for four-and-a-half years. There were a couple times where they said – they didn’t live in the house – so they said, well no, we’re going to just fix it up and sell it. No, we’re going to fix it up and put a tenant in it. We’re thinking about moving into it ourselves. And a whole bunch of just voicemails that we had to leave. Then after four-and-a-half years, we called them and they said, well is that offer still good? We said, I don’t know. It’s been four-and-a-half years. We haven’t seen the house in four-and-a-half years. We actually bought it for less. Four-and-a-half years later we bought it for less.
Brad: What?
Mike: Because the market value had been going up, but it had deteriorated at a faster rate because it was just sitting there vacant for all that time. But the power of this business is, if you get good at follow up, you spend so much time and resources generating those leads, things will come back around if you just stay on it.
Brad: Yep. You’re absolutely right. For sure.
Mike: Let’s talk a little bit about, you mentioned before you see these other people. They’re in their seventh inning, you’re in your first inning, for example. Even if you’re in the same inning, right, people have different trajectories. You don’t know what’s going on. Sometimes there are people that are doing a lot of volume, and then you find out, well yeah, but they’re just co-wholesaling somebody else’s deals and making like a thousand or two. So you’re really comparing apples to oranges. Not that there’s necessarily anything wrong with that, but if you’re not playing that game you’re going to do a lot less volume. Right?
Brad: Yep.
Mike: I know in the Investor Fuel Mastermind we have people in there that have done over 1,000 deals, people doing 100, 150 deals a year. So it can get intimidating in there if you’re newer. But it also can inspire you, right? So there’s lots of people around that can either intimidate the hell out of you or inspire you. Let’s talk a little bit about that phenomenon. In terms of people that are listening, how they can compare themselves to others, or strive to be like those others. Learn from them, but not be intimidated by it to the point to where they just get overwhelmed, that wow, they’re something special and I could never accomplish that. Which isn’t true, by the way.
Brad: Part of it, too, is everybody has their own style, and you’ve got to recognize what you’re style is. Some people are okay with doing 30 deals a month and making $3,000 spreads, and other people want to do 4 deals a month and make $20,000 spreads. What fits your personality best, and then push yourself a little bit further. When I came to that first meeting, we were setting goals, like oh, how many goals do you want to do this year? And I gave a number. Everybody in the room was like, that’s not enough. You need to set the bar higher. And I thought my goal was significantly higher.
But to hear everyone else tell you, look, you can do so many more than that, it changes your mindset. You got to make sure your mind is where it needs to be, and aim high, and set those higher goals, and focus on that. And break it down, too. I’m looking at my board right in front of me, and one thing I did earlier this year was, here’s my goal for the year. Break that up into pieces. What’s a monthly goal? What’s a weekly goal? And I’m not quite there yet for my monthly goal, but I’m getting there. What’s important is that I’m getting there. At the end of the year, even if I don’t hit that goal I did, I know I did whatever I needed to do to get myself in that, hit that weekly goal and that monthly goal. Once I do that, then next year I’ll be doing awesome. You know? And just build, build, build, build, build.
Mike: Right, right. Just to clarify for people that are listening, too. It’s not always more. The answer isn’t always more. Brad just mentioned his first meeting in the Investor Fuel Mastermind where we knew he wanted to leave, he’s got dreams to get an RV and go tour with his family and do all this stuff. And we’re like, hey, you need to stretch a little bit further. Actually, I won’t say any names, there was somebody else in the group that was doing 30 to 40 deals a month already, but their margins were really thin. We talked to him and said, look, you need to be doing less. Less deals, and focus on bigger margins. That’s worked well for that person as well. So it’s not about volume. Units ultimately don’t mean anything. Right? It’s the money you make from it. Does that get you where you want to go financially, freedom-wise? Does it help you get the impact that you need to leave an impact on your family or your community? Or whatever it might be for you. Right?
Brad: Right. And like you said, also when you’re setting those goals, and I think you had said this to me and you also said it to the other individual in our group, was, you pigeon-holed yourself into that X amount per deal. Just set that goal per deal to be this much, and you’ll do it. And then set it to be that much, and you’ll do it. Because when you tell yourself that, oh, I’m going to do this amount per deal, you’re going to do that amount per deal, and you’re probably not going to do any more than that.
Mike: Right. Yeah, especially if you do have a team and you’re talking to your team about it, just saying hey, we want our average margin to be this. Well you’re just conditioning them to never do better than that.
Brad: Correct. Yep.
Mike: Awesome. What are some other tips you can give on how to be inspired by people? I’ll even say it for this show. Honestly, this is show number 414. We’ve had some awesome rockstars on this show before, some of the most talented real estate investors in the country. We also probably have a lot of new or newer people that are listening to it, and I kind of want to send this message clearly. We’re doing this to inspire you, not to basically intimidate you to the point to where you’re like, wow, I could never accomplish those things, so I’m not even going to try.
Brad: Yeah.
Mike: Maybe you could share some guidance, Brad, on how to be inspired by other people’s success but to not let it kind of pull you down. I’ve been there before, I’ve felt that way, like I’m not worthy of talking to this person or whatever. And maybe you have, too. But I look at it very differently now. Maybe you can share your thoughts on that.
Brad: At the end of the day, we’re all people. Right? Find that person that you look up to and build a relationship with that person. Sit down and talk to them, and they’ll encourage you to be better. They’ll guide you. One of the guys that we know locally that’s very successful, I’ve built a good kind of friendship with him over the years here locally, and he’s helped me out, and we’ve done some deals together. And I’ve done that with other people.
Last week, I had lunch with a local real estate developer here in my area, and I was just talking to him and he was like, man, if I were doing what you’re doing at your age, I would be so much better now. But to me, I’m looking at him and I’m like, well I want to be this guy, doing these big subdivision developments and stuff like that. They put it into perspective for you, and you quickly realize, well you know, maybe I’m doing all right. They’re there to encourage you. Even if it’s not a full blown mentorship, if you’ve got a bunch of really good mentors that are giving you bits of advice. That’s why you should join a mastermind, everybody.
Since I’ve joined Investor Fuel, I mean, I’ve done some local small masterminds here locally, but getting in a room with A players that are just where you want to be five or ten years from now and surround yourself with those people. Once you get to meet them, they’re all just regular people like you and I. I’ve been listening to your show for years and years, you know? Now that you meet these people, you can still look up to them, and they’ll encourage you to be better.
Mike: Yeah. I’ve found that in the corporate world I got to know some CEOs of Fortune 500 companies when I was in the corporate world. And it’s like, man, these are just regular people. They’ve got problems, they’ve got issues at home. Truthfully, the thing is that they feel more alienated, because a lot of people — and real estate investors are this way, too — they feel more alienated because people feel like they can’t approach them. Some of the most successful people I know are some of the most giving people I know. They surprisingly don’t get asked more for things, to share their knowledge or share their insights, because people just assume, well I can’t. I don’t want to waste his time. That’s how everybody feels. It’s a weird thing, but it’s a real thing.
Brad: Reach out to them and offer to buy them lunch or coffee or something, and just sit down and talk to them. Offer to help them with something. Or bring them a deal.
Mike: Bring them a deal, that’s better.
Brad: Bring them a deal and share the profit with them, and take a little bit. But the learning you’re going to gain from that is so much better than anything.
Mike: Yeah. Absolutely. Awesome, Brad. Hey, this is great information you’ve shared today. Thanks for sharing with us.
Brad: Yeah, definitely.
Mike: Hey, if folks wanted to learn more — I know you’re doing a bunch of Facebook Live stuff — if they wanted to follow along, where should they go?
Brad: I’m Brad Woodall on Facebook, and then my company is Arbor View Properties out of Georgia. It’ll show up at like Milton, Georgia, that’s the city. But Brad Woodall on Facebook. I’m on Instagram, BradKWoodall on Instagram. Most of my Instagram is just pictures of my kids, but I do some real estate stuff in there, too. Then I’ve got a couple YouTube videos. YouTube channels are BradWoodall_REI, and then Arbor View Properties on YouTube, but Arbor View Properties is more focused towards sellers.
Mike: Sure, sure. Okay. Well I’ll dig up a couple of these links and then we’ll add them to the show notes down below. So thanks again for joining us today, my friend.
Brad: Yeah, definitely. It’s been great.
Mike: Yeah, yeah. And we’ll see you in just a couple weeks at Investor Fuel.
Brad: Right around the corner.
Mike: Yeah, coming up fast. Everybody, thanks for joining us today. This is episode number 414 with my buddy, Brad Woodall. If you’re just getting started in real estate investing, or if you’ve been running for a while and you’re just not getting the results you want, it’s probably because you’ve got some doubt in your mind as to whether you can do it, and maybe you’re just not focused on creating a business and a systematic process to everything you do in your approach. Hope you got a lot out of today’s show.
If you haven’t yet, subscribe to us or give us a rating on iTunes – where else are we at? – Stitcher Radio, Google Play, lots of other places where you can listen podcasts, or subscribe to us on YouTube or follow it along there. Or of course, watch our shows on flipnerd.com, or you can listen to them there. If you could give us a rating there, we’d appreciate it. It’s kind of the fuel that keeps us going forward here and allows us to go from 414 shows to wherever we go from here. So no end in sight. Appreciate everybody, have a great day. We’ll see you on the next episode.
If you’re an active real estate investor already doing deals, and looking to double or triple your business, you should consider joining the Investor Fuel Real Estate Investor Mastermind. We’re a small group of investors that share our best practices, tips, and tricks with one another in an effort to all win. Real estate investing can be a lonely business for successful real estate investors, but it doesn’t have to be. Investor Fuel members meet four times a year, but we talk to each other 365 days a year, and we focus on improving the profitability of our business. Improving the quality of our lives. That’s why we do this, right? And making an impact on those around us, so we can truly leave a legacy.
We limit our membership to only one to two members per market so everyone shares their knowledge, tips, and tricks openly and honestly. Our members include some buying one to two houses a month, up to some of the most respected investors and leaders in the real estate investing industry, some of which have personally done over 1,000 deals. If you’d like to be considered for our invitation only world class mastermind, please visit investorfuel.com to request your personal invitation. Our next meeting is coming up quickly. Go to investorfuel.com now to learn more.
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