Show Summary

In a world where most real estate investors are still using old school techniques for finding deals, Jason Lucchesi has cracked the code on how to use social media for many different areas of real estate investing, including finding off market deals. While so many are watching kittens box on Facebook, Jason is doing deals. In this episode of the FlipNerd.com Flip Show, Jason opens up and shares tips that will make you say “why didn’t I think of that!?”. This is a show you don’t want to miss…so check it out now!

Highlights of this show

  • Meet Jason Lucchesi, master of using social media to find off market deals.
  • Learn how Jason uses Linkedin to find deals, buyers, sellers, asset managers, lenders and more.
  • Join the discussion on the power of Linked to find many different resources for your business.

Resources and Links from this show:

Listen to the Audio Version of this Episode

FlipNerd Show Transcript:

Mike: Welcome to the Flipnerd.com podcast. This is your host, Mike Hambright, and on this show I will introduce you to VIPs in the real estate investing industry, as well as other interesting entrepreneurs whose stories and experiences can help you take your business to the next level. We have three new shows each week, which are available in the iTunes store or by visiting Flipnerd.com. So without further ado, let’s get started.
Hey. It’s Mike Hambright, with Flipnerd.com. Welcome back for another exciting VIP interview where I interview some of the most successful real estate investing experts and entrepreneurs in our industry, to help you learn and grow. Today, we’ve got a great show. I’m joined by Jason Lucasey [SP], who’s a real estate investor. He’s a mentor and a coach, and he teaches others a number of things, including how to find off-market deals through social media, so like LinkedIn and Facebook, but finding deals that are off-market. This is fascinating because I don’t know anybody else that’s really teaching this or anybody else that’s really doing it successfully. So he’s going to share some great . . . This is a great topic for us to talk about today.
You’re probably going to learn some things that you’ve never heard before. So it’s going to be a great show. Before we get started though, let’s take a moment to recognize our featured sponsors.

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We’d also like to thank National Real Estate Insurance Group, the nation’s leading provider of insurance to the residential real estate investor market. From individual properties to large scale investors, National Real Estate Insurance Group is ready to serve you.

Please note, the views and opinions expressed by the individuals in this program do not necessarily reflect those of FlipNerd.com or any of its partners, advertisers or affiliates. Please consult professionals before making any investment or tax decisions as real estate investing can be risky.

Hey, Jason. Welcome to the show.

Jason: Hey. Thanks for having me, Mike.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah, glad you’re on. So we have a bunch of mutual friends, and I’ve heard great things about the work you’re doing. I’m glad you’re going to share with us today.

Jason: Absolutely. Thanks for having me. I really, really appreciate it.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. So before we get started, why don’t you kind of give us a little bit of your background on how you got started in real estate investing, and then we’ll start talking about some of the stuff you’re doing through social media.

Jason: Absolutely. I originally got started probably back in early 2008, and that was because I was coming off of a transition of being in the mortgage business for about five years and had no college degree. So it was really difficult for me to find any type of a decent job, especially with a child on the way.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: All I was being able to get offered was 100% commission jobs. So I was just like, “Well, if I’m going to be working for somebody else, I might as well do something for myself.” That’s when I kind of got into real estate investing, had a lot of failures, and I really started hitting it off really well with short sales.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: And started doing a bunch of short sales. I built up a strong team, and we were closing a lot of short sales. Then some new Indiana legislation passed. For those of you that don’t know me, I’m from the Indiana area. Some new Indiana legislation passed, making it really difficult to do short sales. So I just kind of avoided them and started really focusing on rehabs, notes, and off-market deals that I’m doing right now.

Mike: Okay. Okay.

Jason: Yeah.

Mike: For you, off-market deals . . . For me, historically it’s been direct-to-seller type stuff. We spent a lot of money on advertising. We get a chance to sit at the kitchen table or couch, no matter how disgusting that might be, and talk about how to solve people’s problems and truly try to solve people’s problems. For you, you’ve been focused more on the REO market and other asset managers and things of that nature.

Jason: Yeah, I’ve been focusing a lot on developing bank relationships. I’m talking not banks like Bank of America or Chase. I’m talking like local or regional level banks.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: Also, hedge funds and private sellers. Yeah, exactly what you mean. Off-market, to me, means it’s not on Craigslist. It’s not on Loop Net or the MLS. It’s like completely off-market. It’s not being circulated all around the Internet either.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Cool. So tell us a little bit about . . . Obviously that’s evolved over time. So talk about how that’s maybe evolved with . . . Because even when . . . I started in 2008 as well. At one point, we got a bank relationship that we bought a number of deals from. That was like a division of Wells Fargo, which just seemed like this is crazy that we found this and got some deals through it. How do we replicate that? Which, from our perspective and our experience, became impossible to replicate because there got to be a point where a lot of banks just said, “Well, we have to list everything. Everything has to go on the MLS.” I know that’s evolved over time, but talk about kind of the evolution that’s happened from getting access to deals through asset managers to where it is today.

Jason: Sure. Well, as you know, a lot of banks aren’t really releasing REOS like they used to.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: They’re sitting on them. Most of the time, they’re having a really tough time getting individuals out of the home. That’s why we’re having this zombie REO problem. I think they’re calling it zombie . . . No, vampire REOs.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: I get confused when they talk about zombies and vampires, but the vampire REOs is when the original owner of record is still in the property, and the bank really hasn’t done anything to kick them out. So we’re coming across that problem in a major way. I’m not sure if you’re experiencing it in your market, but it has been a major problem across the entire country. So with that being said, they have been liquidating privately on a different level. Now, Bank of Americas, Chases, Wells Fargo’s, they’re the ones that are really liquidating the REOs to hedge funds. That’s why we’re really not seeing a lot of those. But hedge funds . . . A lot of these hedge funds that got involved with this early on, they didn’t understand a whole lot about it.

Mike: Right.

Jason: So right now, they’re actually liquidating a lot of these assets . . .

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: For way less than what we . . . I’d probably say 30 cents on the dollar, because they probably purchased them in what I call data tapes . . .

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: They bought 10,000, 20,000 at a time, and they probably got them for five to 10 cents on the dollar. So they’re still making a really good return on their investment, but most of these hedge funds were built with Wall Street money. As you know, Wall Street people want to get in and out as quickly as possible, and they want their money, their profit, as quickly as possible. That’s not the case with a lot of . . . with how a lot of these funds were structured. A lot of them were six to seven years, and a lot of these guys are wanting their money pulled out actually right now.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: So that’s why we’re going to start seeing more and more of these properties start to get on the market.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah.

Jason: So that’s essentially what I’ve been seeing over the past 12 to 18 months develop. I think it’s . . . We’re going to start seeing a flood of deals come on probably within the next 12 to 24 months.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. So while a lot of people are spending their time watching kittens box on the Internet and stuff like that, you figured out a way to generate leads on Facebook and LinkedIn and maybe other social media things.

Jason: Right. Yeah.

Mike: So tell us a little bit about that.

Jason: Sure. Well, I started doing . . . I got on LinkedIn and Facebook probably right around ’07, ’08. Never really thought of it as a way for me to generate any business. I really didn’t start utilizing it until probably late 2009.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: Probably early 2010. I really started doing it on LinkedIn before Facebook, and I started connecting with people through groups. It just . . . There’s so many different groups on LinkedIn. When I started . . . When you did a search for asset manager, there was maybe 400,000, 500,000 people that came up with the title asset manager. If you do it now, it’s close to like 1.3 million people. So it’s changed quite a bit within the last four years. Asset managers can be people that either work for private equity funds. They could be from banks, hedge funds. So those people are people that you can get in contact with. Now, I tell people . . . I’d say 85% of those people, out of the 1.3 million, are going to be people that you could do business with, but there’s no way just one person could reach out to that many people on LinkedIn. So I just tell people. I’m like go through their profile. Make sure they’re active. What I mean by that is make sure they have a decent amount of connections. I always recommend 300-plus or higher, and I always recommend make sure they’re in some sort of groups. You can do that by scrolling down on their page and seeing what type of groups they’re involved in.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: So if they’re not involved in any real estate groups, but they’re involved in like sewing groups or something different than what their niche is that they’re involved in, I’d probably pass on those people.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: But the other 15%, Mike, are people that deal with retirement accounts, Roth IRAs, mutual funds, stocks, bonds.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: But the other thing with that is some people think that 15% they can’t do business with, but those people all have access to money.

Mike: Right.

Jason: What a lot of real estate investors need from Matt and I, my business partner, Matt Andrews . . . We’ve been doing a lot of one-on-one calls over the past two weeks. The number one thing people need is money for their deals.

Mike: Right.

Jason: So it’s like literally right there on LinkedIn. These people have money. They’re making like maybe .5% on their money, and they could be making . . . I tell people. I’m like, let them tell you what they want before you tell them, because we get all jazzed up. We’ll say, “Yeah, we can give you 12%.” Then they get scared because they think it might be a scam.

Mike: Right.

Jason: Then they’ll come back and say maybe 7%, 8%, and we’re like, “Sure. That sounds good to me.”

Mike: Yeah. Yeah.

Jason: But there’s people out there, that other 15%, those are people that are looking to do stuff with their money. You can do private money deals all day long with those individuals.

Mike: Yep. Yep. So on LinkedIn, for example, tell us how you go from . . . how you get from somebody that has a title or a keyword somewhere planted in their profile of asset manager, to actually finding somebody you can talk to, and then from talking to them, get to where they’re sharing deals with you.

Jason: Yeah. Absolutely. I typically like to find groups on LinkedIn. So what I typically do, Mike, is I’ll type in “real estate” or “real estate investing.” I’ll click on the blue magnifying glass within LinkedIn’s search engine. Then what I’ll do is I’ll narrow it by selecting groups.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: By doing that, I can pull up all the real estate investing groups. I believe the top group has close to 500,000 members.

Mike: Yep.

Jason: So that’s a really great starting point for me to find other real estate investors and just start sending them messages to see like, “Hey. Are you interested in possibly connecting or doing some business together?” Because when you mention, “Hey. I’m coming across off-market deals, and I’m getting them at a substantial discount,” and you ask them, “Would you be interested,” if they say, “No,” then obviously that’s somebody that you don’t want to do business with, but nine times out of 10 they’re going to say, “Yes.”

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: The other cool thing is you can geo-target them. So if you’re looking for people in the Texas market, you can type in “Texas,” and it’s going to pull up all the people that have a profile and live in Texas.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: It’s really cool. A lot of these . . .

Mike: So something you just said is you’re kind of saying, “Hey. I have off-market deals. Are you interested?” So these are folks that you’re trying to build relationships with to actually get deals from? Or to sell to? Or . . .

Jason: Both.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: We teach people how to find actual buyers on LinkedIn. We also teach them how to find sellers . . .

Mike: Okay.

Jason: That have off-market deals, because there’s, believe it or not, they have asset manager groups. They have special assets groups. They have credit risk groups. These are all people that work for banks or hedge funds, and they’re all talking about . . . They interact with one another, and they probably trade assets. They possibly have capital to deploy to maybe acquire some of their assets, but those groups are huge. There’s like 5000, 10,000, 15,000-plus members in those groups. Those are all people that are with local and regional level banks.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: That you can start reaching out to. We’ve had somebody that got involved, sent out a message to some bank in, I believe, Mississippi, and they sent them like 10 deals to take a look at to see if they were interested, that nobody else knew about . . .

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: . . . because your competition isn’t going to pick up the phone and call these people . . .

Mike: Right.

Jason: . . . unless they feel confident in what they’re doing.

Mike: Yeah. So are these . . .

Jason: You know what I mean?

Mike: Talk a little bit about kind of how you start that communication process. So you find somebody. You send them a private message through LinkedIn, and you try to get them to email you back. At some point, you want to get it out of LinkedIn. Right?

Jason: Sure. The best way to do it without coming across as being spammy is sending a message to that person. Now, you can only send them a message if you’re in the same group with them, unless you want to pay for a premium account.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: That’s going to run you between, I believe, $30 up to $150.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: So what I’m showing people is how to do it for free and telling people that are listening or watching this is all you need to do is join the same group as these folks, and you can send them a private message without having to pay for it.

Mike: Yeah. Are there some restrictions inside of LinkedIn, limitation on the number of messages you can send if you’re sending them to somebody you’re in the same group with?

Jason: As of right now, no. There is a limitation on how many groups you can be in as a basic member, which is 50.

Mike: Okay. But no restriction on number . . . So you can send as many messages.

Jason: Well . . .

Mike: I’m trying to think back of some experiences I’ve had where I feel like I’m in the same group with somebody, but then it’s asking me to put in their email address, or maybe we just weren’t in the same group, and I didn’t realize it.

Jason: Well, if you join the group, and you’re still waiting for the group to actually approve you . . .

Mike: Could be.

Jason: Then that may be a different story.

Mike: Yeah. I gotcha.

Jason: But the other thing too is if you just try connecting with them, you may need to have an email address at that point in time.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Okay.

Jason: Yeah.

Mike: Then so once you connect with them and send them a private message, do you try to take that communication outside of LinkedIn?

Jason: Yeah. Well, what I want to do is I want them to connect with me. So when I send that message, I want them to accept my invitation to connect with them, because a lot of people don’t know this. You get their direct email address. You get their work phone number, their cell phone number. You get the address to where they work. So I’m still a big believer in doing direct mail. So if somebody just accepted your invitation to connect, I would send them like a letter, just saying, “Hey. Thanks. I look forward to doing business with you.” You also get their company website access. So there’s a directory on there for possibly more people to do business with. But once I make a connection with them on LinkedIn, I’ll send them out a message to see if we’re compatible to do business with. Then I’ll take it . . . After there, I’ll take it a step further, and we’ll talk. The other cool thing is once you become connected to each other, you can also get their instant messenger. So right now, you and I are doing Skype. You know? Somebody else can maybe have a Google instant messenger or Yahoo instant messenger, and you can start doing instant messaging with these people.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: It’s pretty cool. You get access to so much stuff.

Mike: Yeah, and you can download, to a CSV, all your contacts’ information too. Right?

Jason: Yep. Yep.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: I’ve done that. You know? I downloaded like 300 asset managers, and I made it to where it was really personal. Their first name was spelled correctly, and it just wasn’t all lower-case, because some people that come in on our email list, they put their first name all lower-case. So what I did was I just made it look presentable, like I was sending a personal message to them, which I was.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: The response was great. I received like a 40% open rate on the emails, and I was able to find a few people to do business with.

Mike: Yeah. That’s awesome.

Jason: So that’s a cool way to simplify your business. You know? You know, and I know, you could go to iContact or Constant Contact, and you could get a free account that gives you 500 emails that you could add for free. Mail Chimp has 2000. So you can literally do a lot of what I do on a very limited budget.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. So your purpose is originally to . . . initially to engage them.

Jason: Yes.

Mike: Then at some point, you say, “Hey. By the way, I’m looking for this,” or you’re kind of basically asking them how you can engage a little bit more, would they be interested in talking about it.

Jason: Yeah. I let them know that I’m a real estate investor. The key thing is when you’re talking to maybe banks or hedge funds, I typically let them know that I have capital that I’m looking to deploy. I may say, “Hey. I’m looking to deploy in these markets,” and they’ll go ahead and send me a list of what they have.

Mike: Okay.

Jason: I’ll let them know we could close fast and as soon as we take a look and do our due diligence, we can close extremely fast. You know? Similar like the “We buy houses” people. They say, “We can buy a house in three days,” or however long they want to say it.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: We let them know we can close extremely fast. So they know that we’re serious.

Mike: So you said you’re primarily going after smaller regional banks or local banks.

Jason: Correct.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: Because most of the larger banks, they will not . . .

Mike: You can’t even find the decision-maker. Yeah.

Jason: . . . even talk to us unless we have . . . Well, you can find the decision-maker, but . . . They’ll deal with you if you have . . . if you maybe want to do an asset that’s half a million dollars or more.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: If you’re talking below that amount, they won’t sell you anything on a one-off basis, which means one property at a time. A bulk package for them is selling off like 10,000 deals at a time.

Mike: Right.

Jason: I don’t know if you have $100 million, but I certainly don’t . . .

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: To just buy up those type of assets.

Mike: Yeah, I have to check my wallet. I think I might be a little bit shy of that. Yeah. No, I know. I really don’t know many people that have successfully bought large packages that aren’t institutions, but the ones that I have seen . . . In the past, people are like, “Hey. We’ve got a tape of this many properties. Does anybody want to buy into it?” But there was always a bunch of crap in it too. It was like . . . Yeah, I like . . . About 25% of that is kind of at least geographically where I want to buy, and the rest of it is like four hours away in the middle of nowhere or just . . . You know? It was always lumped together with stuff that you didn’t even want to touch.

Jason: Right. Right. Yeah. It’s fine. It’s kind of hard finding good, solid packages that come from other people that you’re not working directly with.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: So I just let people know brokers, that’s not really the route to go down, unless they can allow you to do a conference call with the seller, and then you can actually verify that the product is actually real. You can talk to the decision-maker on the phone, without circumventing the broker.

Mike: Right.

Jason: But there’s so many people out there that do a daisy chain. It just wastes everybody’s time.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah.

Jason: You know what I mean?

Mike: Yeah. So LinkedIn . . . From my perspective, LinkedIn is a great . . . Most people . . . Do you tend to have a more . . . People are using it more on a professional level than Facebook, let’s say historically..

Jason: Yeah.

Mike: Maybe that’s changing. So they’re likely to have more information about their job and things. The Facebook side, for me, seems like it’s a little more of a personal network, where people are probably sharing pictures of their family and stuff that’s a little bit different.

Jason: Yeah.

Mike: So I know you started using LinkedIn, and now you’re using Facebook. So kind of talk about those differences and the pros and cons, I guess, of Facebook versus LinkedIn.

Jason: Sure. Sure. Well, the other thing too that I just wanted to mention is you said something about how many messages can you send on LinkedIn. I want to bring that up because I’m going to discuss it here about Facebook too. I would just send out probably five to 10 messages, get it tested. Because if you start getting marked as like they don’t know you, then that’s going to be a red flag on your account. The way I kind of go about that is I look at people’s profiles first. Okay? The way I do that is I see like how many connections they have. Have they met the 300-plus connections? Are they involved in active groups?

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: If they are, then that’s somebody I’m going to send a message out to.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: So the people I won’t is if they don’t have a whole lot of connections, and they have like no groups. That’s a flag. I don’t want to send them anything because they’re going to definitely say they don’t know who you are.

Mike: Right. Less tolerant of stuff like that.

Jason: Yeah. Maybe they got on there because their boss told them, “Hey. We’re trying to put the website up, and we’re trying to get noticed more. So make a profile, please.”

Mike: Yeah. Yep.

Jason: But the same thing goes with Facebook. You know? Outside of the main feed, we go, and we hook up with people in actual real estate groups. There’s so many of them on Facebook.

Mike: Yep.

Jason: You could start connecting with people, and you could, again, you could target it. I’ve got a group called The Central Indiana Mastermind, something like that. I don’t know the exact name, but a lot of people on there are from Indiana. So we could start connecting with people. They could post properties on there. I could go through the numbers. I think there’s like 2400 members on there. I could send them out private messages, stating, “Hey. Are you looking to do this? Or blah, blah, blah.” You could start connecting with them on that level as well.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: So it’s pretty cool. A lot of those groups . . . As soon as you join the groups, you can start having access to the actual members . . .

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: And sending out private messages. Again, before you start sending those out, just be careful of who you’re sending the message out to. If it’s somebody that hasn’t posted anything in like a year, I probably wouldn’t send them a private message.

Mike: Right. Right.

Jason: You know?

Mike: Any kind of tips on using Facebook versus LinkedIn? It’s much more kind of one-to-one. Right? You can’t download a list.

Jason: Right.

Mike: Most of the messaging . . . The email address that Facebook gives you is probably not their best email. It’s probably their @Facebook email address, which nobody uses.

Jason: Yes. Right.

Mike: So any kind of tips on how to simplify that? Or any ninja tricks that you know of? I do know that you obviously could . . . If you know how to advertise effectively on Facebook, you can just target the people in that group to where they’re effectively seeing your ad.

Jason: Right.

Mike: But in terms of a one-to-one communication, do you have any ninja tricks for us?

Jason: You know, the best way to do that is just start having a conversation with them.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: You know? If they’re interested in receiving off-market deals, or if they’re interested in selling, they’re going to give you their phone number plus their email address. All you have to do is ask for it. There’s really . . . It’s super basic information that you ask for.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: I typically send out the same message that I would connecting with somebody on LinkedIn.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: You know? I typically say, “Hey. I saw that we’re a part of the same group,” and I say the group. I just let them know, “Hey. I’m a real estate investor from Indiana. I’m doing investing across the nation. This is what I’m doing. Would you like to connect and do some business together?”

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: Then if I don’t receive a response from them, then it’s more than likely not somebody that we’re going to be compatible with to do business with.

Mike: Right.

Jason: So that’s probably the best tip I would give, is just being . . . My big thing is being open and transparent to these people, just having communication being key. You know? It’s honestly just going back to some of the basic, basic stuff, because a lot of the basics, for me, still work. I still do a lot of direct mail. A lot of the basic stuff still works very, very well.

Mike: Yeah. So talk a little bit about your time, because I know that if you’re doing a lot of the things that you’re talking about here yourself, it can become very time-consuming. I know there’s other people like me that want to outsource everything to a virtual system and find some way to take it from this to like doing a million of something a day, which takes away . . .

Jason: Right.

Mike: . . . from the personal approach that you’ve talked about here. Is this something that you have to spend all of your time doing? Have you found ways to kind of outsource some components of it?

Jason: No, you can absolutely hire somebody from ODesk to do this.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: It could still be extremely personable. All you’re doing is you’re sending out a message to these people. So if I was having a VA send out the message to you, I would just have them say, “Hi, Mike,” and then just have it be extremely personable, like, “Hey. I’m sending you a direct message that’s coming directly from me.”

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: Let’s connect there.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: Then I would instruct the VA how to proceed forward with different messages after I’ve received contact.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Awesome. Well, Jason, I know you have a couple of training products that teach people how to use this in much more depth than we were able to get to today. Do you want to share how to get there? And we can provide a link down below the video as well.

Jason: Sure. No. If people want to come visit Getontheinside.com, we’ve got tons of video content on there like training videos, showing people how to get private money, how to talk to certain individuals. But if you would . . . If people want to find out more about us, they can join our mailing list. I think we give away a free book, a free book on . . . I believe it’s on how to do real estate investing through the Internet. So they’ll get a free book just by going to Getontheinside.com. Yeah, we’d be more than happy to speak with people that are interested in pursuing this, for sure.

Mike: Okay. Okay. Great. Well, hey, thanks so much for your time. Is there any kind of final comments here on how to use social media for real estate investing and maybe just how people can kind of, we talked about a lot of stuff here today, but how to take baby steps and how to get started?

Jason: Sure. Yeah. I would probably, like I said, just start finding the right profiles of people that you want to do business with. So off the bat, I always tell people when they’re getting started in real estate is to build their buyers’ list. So I would . . . That’s the first thing I would establish on LinkedIn, is start connecting with other investors. Maybe they’re wholesalers, but maybe they already have a buyers’ list, and you guys can start doing co-wholesale deals together. So that’s a great way to do it. If you already have that business figured out, then I would just use LinkedIn as a tool to connect with people that have those private, off-market deals that your cash buyers really, really want.

Mike: Yeah.

Jason: But yeah, that’s kind of the key tip, is just really kind of keeping it simple. There’s nothing super analytical or technical about doing this. I’m not a super tech-savvy guy. So I tried finding something that I could do that was super simple, and that’s definitely it.

Mike: Yeah. There’s a lot of . . . I mentor a lot of people. I often say to people, “You just need to set a date in your calendar.” This is one of those things where I need to take my own advice more often, but set a date in the calendar for like once a quarter, and just say, “For an hour, I’m just going to go to a Starbucks or whatever and just sit down. All I’m going to think about is how to get back to basics.”

Jason: Yeah.

Mike: Because we all have a way to be going forward. The next thing you know, you start going off the reservation and doing a bunch of crazy stuff.

Jason: Yeah. Yeah.

Mike: You don’t really realize it at the time because it just happens a little bit at a time. The next thing you know, you’re doing all sorts of crazy stuff that’s taking up your time and using your resources and utilizing your team more than they maybe have time for. So I think to just kind of reflect on that like, “How do I get back to basics? Or do I need to get back to basics? Or what am I doing right now that is just not effective and we just need to stop right now?”

Jason: Right. The other thing too is I want to say before we end this, I’d probably make a goal, make a plan, and I’d probably send out five messages per day. Then once you start getting a week past the five messages and things are going good, I’d probably start sending out 10 then a day. You know? Start sending out as many as you want until you get to where you . . . until you want. Then I’d still keep sending out those messages, by having that VA do that for you, but definitely put out a plan that you would like to see yourself accomplishing on a daily basis and just keeping it simple.

Mike: Yep.

Jason: You know?

Mike: Absolutely.

Jason: And I just want to say thanks again, Mike, for having me on your show. I’ve been wanting to be on for a while now. So this is actually pretty cool.

Mike: Yeah. Yeah, I’m glad you’re here.

Jason: Thanks.

Mike: Yeah. Thanks so much for being on. Thanks for sharing. It’s really interesting information. I encourage people to go to your blog, which we’ll link down below here. I know you’ve got some training products coming up too on specifically how to use LinkedIn and Facebook for . . . You go into a lot more depth. I think I don’t know anybody else that’s talking about this. It seems so obvious. I mean, there’s so many of us that are addicted to Facebook and on there all day long, but it’s . . .

Jason: Right. Right.

Mike: But it’s totally nonproductive time. I’m looking at stuff that . . .

Jason: It is.

Mike: You know? How many more motivational quotes can we look at? You know? Stuff like that.

Jason: Exactly.

Mike: So anyway, but hey, thanks for sharing your insights on that. It’s really good information. I think a lot of people will get a lot of benefit out of it.

Jason: Awesome. Thanks, man. I appreciate your time.

Mike: Yeah, you too. We’ll talk to you soon.

Jason: All right, buddy.

Mike: All right. Bye-bye. Thanks for joining us on today’s Flipnerd.com podcast. To listen to more of our shows and hear from incredible guests, please access all of our podcasts in the iTunes store. You can also watch the video versions of our shows by visiting us at Flipnerd.com.