> rehabbing

The profits that a rehab project can bring in are most of the time much higher compared to other exit strategies like assignments and wholesale deals. With this higher profit comes higher risk and we don’t recommend diving into a heavy rehab project when you’re just starting out. We’ve selected the top 13 shows over…

> burnout

Burnouts are intimidating. A good amount of real estate investors shy away from them completely. Depending on the extent of the damage, it can be very costly to rehab and there’s so much unknown with what will be found in the property, a lot of investors don’t want that size of project or risk. For…

> rehab costs

Full rehab jobs, when finished, can bring in a substantial profit if you bought at the right price and calculated your rehab costs correctly. The last thing you want though is unexpected rehab costs that eat away at your profit margins! Sure, a few light bulbs here and some window screens there don’t break  the…

> rehabbing small changes

There are a number of reasons why a real estate investor wouldn’t want to do a full rehab on a property. Full rehabs involve more money, more time, more labor, and more risk. Many times a light or minor rehab is enough to sell to a retail buyer, given that all of the mechanicals are…

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Today’s REI Classroom Lesson When planning out a rehab, Holly McKhann stresses how important it is to know what people are wanting in that area! REI Classroom Summary While most rehabs lean towards being more neutral, some neighborhoods have a different feel and this should be considered when selecting the design features. Listen to this…

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Today’s REI Classroom Lesson Lex Levinrad talks to us today about how to determine both material costs and labor costs for upcoming rehab projects. REI Classroom Summary Materials can be easy to calculate if you visit a local hardware store and write down costs for each item potentially needed, room-by-room. For labor costs, Lex explains…